BTC $56772.0455
ETH $3229.2692
BNB $393.0365
SOL $106.6536
stETH $3224.6597
XRP $0.5621
ADA $0.6137
AVAX $38.6261
DOGE $0.0960
TRX $0.1415
wstETH $3753.2551
DOT $8.0619
LINK $18.8685
WETH $3222.5827
MATIC $1.0217
UNI $10.5943
WBTC $56672.8182
IMX $3.2827
ICP $12.8638
BCH $296.0952
LTC $73.4211
CAKE $3.1049
LEO $4.3751
ETC $27.6986
FIL $7.7121
KAS $0.1681
RNDR $7.1714
DAI $0.9992
HBAR $0.1085
ATOM $10.9103
INJ $37.3719
VET $0.0480
TON $2.1032
OKB $51.5043
FDUSD $1.0007
LDO $3.4620
STX $3.0518
XMR $133.5710
ARB $1.8885
XLM $0.1189
GRT $0.2844
TIA $16.9400
NEAR $3.9210
ENS $21.6903
MKR $2126.5962
WEMIX $2.0704
APEX $2.3723
BTC $56772.0455
ETH $3229.2692
BNB $393.0365
SOL $106.6536
stETH $3224.6597
XRP $0.5621
ADA $0.6137
AVAX $38.6261
DOGE $0.0960
TRX $0.1415
wstETH $3753.2551
DOT $8.0619
LINK $18.8685
WETH $3222.5827
MATIC $1.0217
UNI $10.5943
WBTC $56672.8182
IMX $3.2827
ICP $12.8638
BCH $296.0952
LTC $73.4211
CAKE $3.1049
LEO $4.3751
ETC $27.6986
FIL $7.7121
KAS $0.1681
RNDR $7.1714
DAI $0.9992
HBAR $0.1085
ATOM $10.9103
INJ $37.3719
VET $0.0480
TON $2.1032
OKB $51.5043
FDUSD $1.0007
LDO $3.4620
STX $3.0518
XMR $133.5710
ARB $1.8885
XLM $0.1189
GRT $0.2844
TIA $16.9400
NEAR $3.9210
ENS $21.6903
MKR $2126.5962
WEMIX $2.0704
APEX $2.3723
  • Catalog
  • Blog
  • Tor Relay
  • Jabber
  • One-Time notes
  • Temp Email
  • What is TOR?
  • We are in tor
  • Lancefly: a new spy in cyberspace of unknown origin

    Symantec Threat Labs reports that a new Lancefly APT group is using a special Merdoor backdoor to attack government, aviation and telecommunications organizations in South and Southeast Asia.

    Since 2018, Lancefly has been deploying the stealth Merdoor backdoor in targeted attacks for persistence, command execution, and keylogging on corporate networks, according to Symantec. The motive behind the campaigns is believed to be intelligence gathering.

    Symantec researchers did not discover the original infection vector, but found evidence that Lancefly has been using phishing emails, SSH credential brute force, and exploiting public server vulnerabilities to gain unauthorized access over the years.

    Once the attackers enter the target system, they inject the Merdoor backdoor using DLL Sideloading into legitimate Windows processes, which allows the malware to evade detection. Features of the Merdoor:

    • Merdoor installs itself as a service that persists across reboots. This allows her to maintain constant access and gain a foothold in the system;
    • Merdoor communicates with the C2 server using one of several supported communication protocols (HTTP, HTTPS, DNS, UDP, and TCP) and waits for instructions;
    • Merdoor can also accept commands by listening on local ports, but Symantec analysts did not provide specific examples of such interaction;
    • The backdoor also logs the user's keystrokes to capture credentials and other valuable information.

    It has also been observed that Lancefly uses Impacket's "Atexec" feature to immediately execute a scheduled task on a remote machine via the SMB protocol. Experts suggest that attackers use the feature to spread to other devices on the network or to delete output files created by other commands.

    Cybercriminals try to steal credentials by swapping LSASS process memory or stealing the SAM and SYSTEM registry. In addition, Lancefly encrypts the stolen files using a fake version of WinRAR and then extracts the data using Merdoor.

    Lancefly attacks have also seen the use of a newer, lighter, and more feature-rich version of the ZXShell rootkit, which is used to deliver payloads that match the host's system architecture, read and execute shellcode from a file, kill processes, and more. The rootkit uses an install and update utility that shares code with the Merdoor bootloader, indicating that Lancefly uses a common codebase for its tools.

    The researchers were unable to attribute the Lancefly faction to a specific country, but the use of the PlugX and ShadowPad RAT trojans, which are used by several Chinese APT groups, link the group to China.

    Author DeepWeb
    Vulnerable Microsoft IIS Servers Became a Spying Tool for Lazarus Group Hackers
    Brave's new browser feature deletes all data about you after closing a tab

    Comments 0

    Add comment