BTC $56772.0455
ETH $3229.2692
BNB $393.0365
SOL $106.6536
stETH $3224.6597
XRP $0.5621
ADA $0.6137
AVAX $38.6261
DOGE $0.0960
TRX $0.1415
wstETH $3753.2551
DOT $8.0619
LINK $18.8685
WETH $3222.5827
MATIC $1.0217
UNI $10.5943
WBTC $56672.8182
IMX $3.2827
ICP $12.8638
BCH $296.0952
LTC $73.4211
CAKE $3.1049
LEO $4.3751
ETC $27.6986
FIL $7.7121
KAS $0.1681
RNDR $7.1714
DAI $0.9992
HBAR $0.1085
ATOM $10.9103
INJ $37.3719
VET $0.0480
TON $2.1032
OKB $51.5043
FDUSD $1.0007
LDO $3.4620
STX $3.0518
XMR $133.5710
ARB $1.8885
XLM $0.1189
GRT $0.2844
TIA $16.9400
NEAR $3.9210
ENS $21.6903
MKR $2126.5962
WEMIX $2.0704
APEX $2.3723
BTC $56772.0455
ETH $3229.2692
BNB $393.0365
SOL $106.6536
stETH $3224.6597
XRP $0.5621
ADA $0.6137
AVAX $38.6261
DOGE $0.0960
TRX $0.1415
wstETH $3753.2551
DOT $8.0619
LINK $18.8685
WETH $3222.5827
MATIC $1.0217
UNI $10.5943
WBTC $56672.8182
IMX $3.2827
ICP $12.8638
BCH $296.0952
LTC $73.4211
CAKE $3.1049
LEO $4.3751
ETC $27.6986
FIL $7.7121
KAS $0.1681
RNDR $7.1714
DAI $0.9992
HBAR $0.1085
ATOM $10.9103
INJ $37.3719
VET $0.0480
TON $2.1032
OKB $51.5043
FDUSD $1.0007
LDO $3.4620
STX $3.0518
XMR $133.5710
ARB $1.8885
XLM $0.1189
GRT $0.2844
TIA $16.9400
NEAR $3.9210
ENS $21.6903
MKR $2126.5962
WEMIX $2.0704
APEX $2.3723
  • Catalog
  • Blog
  • Tor Relay
  • Jabber
  • One-Time notes
  • Temp Email
  • What is TOR?
  • We are in tor
  • The FBI was unable to completely eliminate the popular cybercrime Genesis Market

    v

    Last month, the FBI solemnly announced that the cybercrime infrastructure of the Genesis Market had been taken down and that the market itself had been removed from public access on the public internet. However, an identical version of the marketplace hosted on the dark web, remains active to this day.

    The site administrators only “added fuel to the fire” when they placed in the header of the site information that the market is “fully functioning”, encouraging potential buyers not to be afraid to purchase the necessary data and services.

    Genesis Market is described by police as a "dangerous" website that specializes in selling logins, IP addresses and cookies that make up the "fingerprints" of victims. At the time of the shutdown of the Genesis Market public website, more than two million stolen identities had been sold there.

    Operation Cookie Monster, launched in April of this year, was spearheaded by the FBI and the Dutch police. The result was the announcement of law enforcement officers about the liquidation of the site and the arrest of 119 cybercriminals.

    However, researchers from Netacea, who tracked the dark web version of the market, said the site was only down for a couple of weeks, after which it was fully restored.

    “Fighting cybercrime is very similar to fighting weeds. If you leave some roots, they will grow again,” said Cyril Noel-Tagoe, principal security researcher at Netacea.

    Noel-Tagoe also praised the police for shutting down the regular internet version of the market, but was forced to admit that the operation was more of a disruption to the activity of the attackers than a complete liquidation of the site.

    Experts from Trellix, who assisted the police in disrupting some of the hacking tools sold on the Genesis Market, also agreed that the site's administrators and managers are still at large.

    American and Dutch law enforcement officers have not yet commented on the fact why the darknet version of the market is still available even after its “liquidation”, however, Paul Foster, deputy director of the cybercrime division of the British NCA, noted the following: “Although the darknet version of the site remains active, the volume of stolen data and active users of the market has decreased significantly. I have no doubt that the operation undermined the credibility of the criminals in Genesis Market.”

    Police and many experts agree that a large number of arrests will also have some deterrent effect on cybercriminals involved in the exchange of any data or services on the Genesis Market.

    All in all, shutting down cybercrime sites hosted on the dark web is a truly challenging task. After all, the location of the attackers' servers is often difficult to determine, and sometimes they are even located in jurisdictions that do not respond to requests from foreign law enforcement agencies and do not contribute to the investigation in any way.

    Author DeepWeb
    Interpol and Afripol against hackers: how African authorities tracked down 14 hackers and prevented $40 million in losses
    British Gang Flooding the Market With Drugs Annihilated Over a 3 Year Investigation

    Comments 0

    Add comment