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  • How does crypto scam work on Twitter?


    If you are part of the crypto community on Twitter or just post tweets related to crypto in any way, then you have probably received suspicious messages or emails. And after that, you might have a question: “How does this work and why does someone follow this?”. Well, sit back, in this article we will detail the most popular tricks of crypto scammers on Twitter and explain how they work.

    On Twitter, attackers most often deploy small-scale scam campaigns that target one or two people. The most common tactics to deceive victims are:

    Disguise as well-known people in the crypto community, leaders of various projects, project developers, and so on;
    Various kinds of bait like: “You have a chance to get millions of tokens that you have never heard of! But to claim your winnings, follow the link and pay a small fee so we can transfer your prize to you!”;
    Classics of the genre: phishing links, fake sites and cryptocurrency giveaways.

    Of course, crypto scammers on Twitter do not stand still and constantly improve their schemes and tactics, but it is the three above that users most often encounter.

    How do scam schemes work and why do victims fall for them?

    It's simple - attackers put pressure on the greed of people who want to get money literally out of thin air. It looks something like this:

    1. The victim receives a private message on Twitter. In it, the scammer says that the user has won a certain amount of cryptocurrency, to receive which you need to follow the link to the crypto exchange and activate the promo code. To attract the attention of the victim and lull his vigilance, the attackers offer “prizes” in Bitcoin and Ethereum, trying not to use unknown tokens;
    2. The victim obediently follows the link and activates the code, after which the amount of the “prize” is credited to her account on the exchange.
    3. The user is trying to withdraw cryptocurrency to his wallet in order not to keep it on the exchange. This is where all the fun begins. First, the scammers ask you to confirm your email address - this is how they again try to lull the victim's attention, make her believe that the site is real. And as a bonus, they receive the user's email address in order to try again to deceive the gullible lover of free cryptocurrency in the future. After the victim enters their Bitcoin wallet address, the withdrawal status of the “won” cryptocurrency changes to “Pending”. Here you can see the first puncture of scammers - usually exchanges process transactions instantly, without requiring confirmation.
    4. The withdrawal status changes to “Failed”, after which the victim is asked to deposit 0.02 BTC or 0.3 ETH for verification on the exchange and confirmation of the withdrawal. If the victim believes in this and sends his cryptocurrency, the status of the withdrawal does not change in any way, and the attackers celebrate another victory.
    5. Bonus step. Sometimes scammers try not only to rob the victim, but also to collect his personal data, justifying this with additional verification on the exchange. Typically, the victim is required to upload a photo of their driver's license, passport, social security number, or other proof of identity.

    How to recognize a crypto scammer on Twitter?

    It is not difficult, it is important to remember a few simple things:

    The offer is too good to be true. If someone suddenly offers you a huge amount of cryptocurrency, then you should think twice before clicking on the links in the message;

    They write to you about winning a competition that you have not even heard of. How then did you manage to win the prize mentioned in the message?

    The site of the crypto-exchange indicated in the message appeared recently or is extremely unpopular. Remember, little-known crypto exchanges are among the most unreliable and often used by attackers;

    The Twitter account you received the message from is brand new. Everything is clear here - if a stranger with three subscribers and an account created yesterday offers you a bunch of cryptocurrency, then you should definitely not trust him;

    Someone is trying to impersonate a well-known person in the crypto community, an employee of Twitter or a crypto exchange.

    Summing up

    As you understand, identifying a crypto scammer on Twitter is not so difficult, as they impersonate themselves, offering victims insane amounts of cryptocurrency for participating in non-existent contests. Keep in mind that free cheese is only in a mousetrap and no one will just offer you huge amounts of money in cryptocurrency just like that.

    Author DeepWeb
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